Eyes_of_the_WorldEyes of the World: Robert Capa, Gerda Taro & The Invention of Modern Photojournalism

Coauthored with Marina Budhos

Robert Capa and Gerda Taro were young Jewish refugees, idealistic and in love. As photographers, they set off to capture their generation’s most important struggle—the fight against fascism. Among the first to depict modern warfare, Capa and Taro took powerful photographs of the Spanish Civil War that went straight from the devastation to news magazines. In so doing, they helped birth to the idea of bearing witness with technology, bringing home tragedies from across the world.

Packed with dramatic photos, posters, and maps, this compelling book captures the fascinating story of how photojournalism began.

Forthcoming from Henry Holt and Company on March 28, 2017. Preorder on Amazon or Barnes&Noble.com. If you are interested in a review copy or in an event around Eyes of the World, please contact: erinlcox@gmail.com.

Publisher’s Weekly

“Collaborating as their subjects did, Aronson and Budhos (Sugar Changed the World) vividly and intimately recount the story of pioneering war photojournalists Robert Capa (1913–1954) and Gerda Taro (1910–1937)…Capa and Taro, Jewish immigrants with leftist leanings from Hungary and Germany, threw themselves into the Spanish Civil War with idealism, talent, intuition as photographers, and an exceptional willingness to take risks. Their photos—whether of fleeing civilians, snipers, refugees, bombed buildings, or soldiers—conveyed an immediacy never previously achieved and established a new standard for war reportage.”

Booklist, Starred Review

“The team behind Sugar Changed the World (2010) presents a fascinating look at the evolution of photojournalism during WWII by getting behind the lens with photographers Robert Capa and Gerda Taro…Rather ambitiously, Aronson and Budhos address the escalating tensions between socialist and fascist regimes, the emergence of photographic news magazines and compact cameras, and the lives of Capa and Taro into one seamless discussion. Readers not only get a strong sense of who these photographers were as people, they will understand what made their pictures so special….Dense but never dull, this book exposes art and humanity in history.”